• Jasmine

    run it boo, run it!

  • RzDrms

    You mention that Racha is “committed to providing midwifery care to all who seek it regardless of…gender.” Genuinely curious what kind of midwifery services men need?

  • REK981

    I love this and the mission that EMC is running for. Thank you!!

  • Amanda

    beautiful. looking forward to the documentary series!

  • Peggy Elliot

    Transman/Transgender Man/AFAB Man (Assigned
    Female At Birth): A man who was thought to be a girl when he was born.

  • Heather Armstrong

    Racha has worked very specifically in the transgender community to provide home births, thank you Peggy for the explanation.

  • Abby

    This is a lovely focus given to very important work, thank you.

    One thing I was wondering — I know they’re just words, and this audience generally knows what you mean, but is there a reason to use the term “natural birth” instead of “vaginal” or “unmedicated” (huh, actually, I guess in this particular case, I *am* a little unclear which you mean in each instance!)? I certainly believe that our approach to maternal health in the U.S. seems pretty wrong-headed, and commend those who work towards providing more knowledge and options. When a mother has a medically necessary c-section though, especially if she didn’t want to initially, or when a mother opts for medication for her labor… it’s certainly not an unnatural birth, regardless of what her personal guilt may tell her?

    Thank you also for the extra info on donating to EMC — going there now!

  • Steph Schmidt

    Our first born was delivered by C-section, our second and third were delivered vaginally. I asked my ob dr. at my six week check up if any other children would have to be caesarean and he said.. no, we encourage you to try vaginal as long as the surgery was not related to a medical condition. I truly believe the doctors here need to wake up and quit scheduling unnecessary C-sections, not only is it dangerous it is way more expensive. Thank you for sharing this information!

  • Heather Armstrong

    Thanks for bringing this up. That was laziness on my part, and I’ve changed the language in the post. When I was talking with Racha we were using “natural” to mean with as little medical or technical intervention as possible. But you’re right, “natural” can make women who opt for an epidural or a c-section feel as if the delivery of their child is somehow not as valid.

    They are just words, but words are important. And my goal here is to honor all women and the choices they make for themselves, and sometimes a “not-choice” when medical intervention is necessary.

  • Kimberly Wydeen

    This sounds like a wonderful program.

    But I would like to make a comment about this post from a different perspective. On June 4, 2015 I gave birth to a still born son. He died from a placenta abruption near the end of a routine, textbook pregnancy. He was 5 pounds, 10 ounces, and 18.5 inches long.

    I had a c-section for a variety of mental and physical health reasons. And sometimes when mothers start talking about their unmedicated births, or how strong they were to not have a c-section my blood just boils.

    Yeah, Heather, you were strong to not have drugs when you gave birth to Marlo. Absolutely. But you know what? I’m strong, too, even though I had a c-section. I’m strong even though this happened to me and I don’t fit into any demographic that typically elicits sympathy.

    I think this is a wonderful cause and I donated to it today, as maternal and prenatal health is obviously important to me.

    But I don’t really like the framing of this issue as if getting an unmedicated birth or a c-section isn’t a positive outcome. A healthy mother and child is the important outcome, not how it comes to be.

  • Heather Armstrong

    I am so sorry for your loss. Please see my response to Abby below. Of course a healthy mother and child are the most important outcome. That’s the basis and purpose of this entire organization. This post is about informing women that they have options when so many of us do not know.

  • Kimberly Wydeen

    Thank you.

    I know your writing style has a lot of exaggeration. But I kind of find it hard to believe that so many people came to see you after not having an epidural. Or that you were the first patient in 18 months not to receive one. When I was in the hospital, there was no communication about other patients and their treatment, so I would be surprised anybody was even talking about your medical choices enough to even have that kind of attention. Patient privacy is usually a pretty big deal.

    I agree that all women should have choices and education about those choices. But I think you could have written this post to reflect that more clearly, as it came off to me as another installment in the Mommy Wars of who gave birth in what way. Believe me when I say I think we could all use less of that.

  • Kimberly Wydeen

    Thank you.

    I know your writing style has a lot of exaggeration. But I kind of find it hard to believe that so many people came to see you after not having an epidural. Or that you were the first patient in 18 months not to receive one. When I was in the hospital, there was no communication about other patients and their treatment, so I would be surprised anybody was even talking about your medical choices enough to even have that kind of attention. Patient privacy is usually a pretty big deal.

    I agree that all women should have choices and education about those choices. But I think you could have written this post to reflect that more clearly, as it came off to me as another installment in the Mommy Wars of who gave birth in what way. Believe me when I say I think we could all use less of that.